A sculptor’s labyrinth home, Xavier Corberó

Xavier Corberó has been considered by many to be the most significant Catalan artist since Gaudí.

Nestled in the suburb of Esplugues de Llobregat, Barcelona, we can discover Xavier Corberó’s 32 square kilometer terrain. With a sum up of nine buildings, the estate is a labyrinthine cabinet of curiosities concealed by a heavy medieval stone fence.

 

 

“Corberó was old friends with Salvador Dali and the surreal undoubtedly plays a lingering part in this sublime house”

Corberó’s residence has been an exploration that has taken him 40 years of his life. This epic project remains a work in progress that 80-year-old Corberó has been building for over half his life.

 

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The work has been huge: nine pre-existing and dilapidated industrial structures have been brought back to life, forming a labyrinth composed of studios, living areas, artist residencies, gallery spaces, and a subterranean workshop.

 

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Throughout the house we can see some of Corberó’s own monumental works as if it was a museum. These pieces are often cast in marble and basalt, and are exhibited in prominent collections around the world, including the Met in New York and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

 

The exteriors include geometric concrete structures stacking at different heights to create commanding sculptures amidst the wild surrounds and bodies of water. Across vine-cloaked buildings, details such as floating steps are framed by contrasting curved arches.

 

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The interiors are a medley of man-made caves, whitewashed to form living quarters, workshops and gallery spaces.    

Corberó explains that the driving motivation behind his artistic creations is to create “poetry” – which is exemplified by his eccentric estate. He celebrates honesty in materiality by emphasizing the rugged textures of concrete or timber with perfect imperfection.

 

Each internal lookout in Xavier Corberó ‘s home is carefully considered to maximize views of greenery and welcome light.

 

Corberó was old friends with Salvador Dalí, whose surreal undoubtedly plays a crucial part in this sublime house, where the unexpected always seems to lurk behind a closed door, emerge from an unnoticed corner, or appear out of thin air.

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Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Labyrinth-Home-casa-laberinto-of-Xavier-Corbero-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

Photography by Jerome Galland, courtesy of AD France. Video by Albert Moya, courtesy of NOWNESS.

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