Los Terrenos, a house that mimics its surrounding flora and fauna

Discreetly hidden among its natural surroundings, Los Terrenos is a private holiday retreat that stands out by blending itself with its wooded site. Los Terrenos, or The Terrains, is located on a forested hillside adjacent to the southwest side of Monterrey.

 

Designed by Mexican architect Tatiana Bilbao of Mexico City-based Tatiana Bilbao Estudio, the residence inconspicuously blends into the greenery through a mix of spatial fragmentation and reflections.

 

los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

 

The house consists of three different and separate volumes, each one accommodates different functions and is built in a different material: glass, earth or wood. The design of the three buildings is presented as a conceptual deconstruction of what a house is. The program is disassembled and reassembled as separate, enhancing the entities that still behave as a whole.

 

“The housing program is fragmented according to each component’s function and role within the site, but they are all enclosed in a perfect square in the general plan,” said Bilbao.

 

los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

 

The larger of the volumes is rectangular in plan and is topped with an asymmetrical peaked roof. Facades are clad in mirrored glass, enabling the dwelling to blend with the verdant terrain.

 

“The mirrored glass envelope simultaneously reflects and contains the lush surrounding,” the team said.

 

The landscape strategy in Los Terrenos aimed to mimic the existing flora and fauna of the location.

 

los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

 

Stretching from the floor to the ceiling there is a ceramic screen. It features a chevron-like pattern, which the team has defined as a lattice, and was used in different ways throughout the project.

 

“The lattice was designed to adapt according to different spatial connections and structural possibilities,” said the studio. “It works as a solid and permeable floor, a screen partition, a structural wall, and as a semi-open wall that allows ventilation and sunlight to bathe the interior spaces.”

 

los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture los-terrenos-tatiana-bilbao-more-with-less-magazine-arquitecture

 

Photography is by Rory Gardiner

SPONSORS